The Audacity

Author Ryan Chapman On Tour
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Hardcover
$27.00 US
| $36.00 CAN
On sale Apr 02, 2024 | 288 Pages | 978-1-64129-562-8
A bracing satire about the implosion of a Theranos-like company, a collapsing marriage, and a billionaires’ “philanthropy summit,” for fans of Hari Kunzru and The White Lotus.

In 72 hours, a blockbuster exposé will reveal Victoria Stevens’s multibillion-dollar startup as a massive fraud. And Victoria has gone missing. Has she faked her death, leaving her husband, Guy Sarvananthan, to face the fallout— and potential jail time? Should Guy flee to his native Sri Lanka, an outcast and a failure? Or embrace denial? Opting for the latter, he takes the corporate jet to a private Caribbean island, where the 0.0001% have gathered to decide which one of the world’s biggest problems to “eradicate forever.” Guy drinks and drugs his way into oblivion, through manicured jungles and aboard superyachts, amid captains of industry, legions of staff, and unlikely saboteurs.
 
Meanwhile, Victoria narrates her side of the story from an off-the-grid location in the California desert. In scribbled diary entries shot through with cultish self-help mantras, she plots her comeback, confident she’ll prove everyone wrong. Again.
 
Ryan Chapman’s incisive novel is a swan dive into the abyss and “Martin Amis’s Money for really late, late capitalism” (Amitava Kumar, author of A Time Outside This Time).
Chapter 1
 
The necessary breakthroughs did not occur within the expected or justifiable life cycle of the product.”
     Guy received the text Thursday evening his time, late afternoon her time. He assumed it was meant for the company Slack. She had done this before: the dry nature of the missive, in addition to the formality of the grammar, contrasted with their clipped marital exchanges. Tonight was the Oxfam dinner, which V would have known. He replied with a question mark and drained his second flute.
     As a veteran of the gala circuit, he knew he had ten minutes to eat before interruption by glad-handers and chummy acquaintances. The tuna tartare was a sensorial affront, given the slides of West African children warped by malaria and wefted by malnutrition. At least next week’s Robin Hood gala wouldn’t stoop to a slideshow. Though the chatter at cocktails was that everyone was skipping Robin Hood. Booking Yo-Yo Ma so soon after the Drawing Center . . . Much too much Ma, and certainly not the mood. He took another bite and ignored the scolding voice-over by the model/actor/activist. Yet another ingenue embarrassed by their frictionless ascent.
     Roark Jefferson, seated to his left, pushed aside an untouched plate and sighed with glottal force. “The Drawing Center served steak. And they’re on the ropes. This mess”—he mashed the fleshy pink ziggurat with a fork—“is just guilt made manifest by some aspirant more sous than chef.”
     Guy loved Roark. To the manner born and, like a wizened character actor, a man one couldn’t imagine ever being under fifty. He wore bespoke pinstripe and Charvet shirting, which did a reasonable job of directing the eye away from the splotched complexion of an overripe banana, and he adhered to outmoded WASP traditions like only wearing sneakers on the tennis court. His family had accrued their wealth the old-fashioned way—that is, passively, as rentier moguls. Roark expanded his modest inheritance of Harlem brownstones into a quiet fiefdom and, at the age when most handed over the reins, multiplied his fortune by repurposing shipping containers as stand-alone rooftop apartments. This expansion of the housing inventory earned praise from the mayor and urban studies think tanks. Since Roark could not patent the concept, he stockpiled the global supply of coupling hardware for the containers, which braced the weight transversely. (Roark often corrected people on this point: the containers did not sit on top of the building, but “athwart” it.)
     He had come out of the closet at seventy, which he celebrated with the establishment of an invitation-only cigar club in the Flatiron District: “Like the Yale club, but more selective.”
     Roark leaned over as the slideshow closed with what sounded like fake Satie; the pat outro did not send one reaching for the pocketbook.
     “My boy,” Roark said. “Did I see you at the Drawing Center? A week ago Friday.”
     Guy remembered the invitation. It was either held in the same event space they were sitting in now—a former bank from the gilded age—or in the LES, at the other gilded-age bank-turned-event-space.
     “Couldn’t make it,” he said. “I Guggenheimed. We’re an underwriter.”
     “Well,” Roark said. “That evening I had an insight I’d like to share. With an aesthete such as yourself.”
     “A failed aesthete such as myself,” Guy replied. His previous life fascinated the gala set. They lacquered his decades as a struggling composer with vicarious nostalgia. He didn’t mind, was in fact grateful for how it assuaged his imposter syndrome after V’s pole-vault up the tax brackets. And for how it assuaged other aspects: Guy was almost always the only Sri Lankan in the room, whether it was high school in suburban Minneapolis, conservatory in Philadelphia, or these august rooms. At fundraisers and dinners “In Honor Of” whomever he played the Good Time Charlie, improvising cocktails at the bar (the Ironclad Prenup, the Bahama S-Corp) or tickling the ivories on someone’s Steinway. His piano was barely passable, even to his atrophied ear, and would have been shameful at the old alma mater. But the gala set gave him the benefit of the doubt. As was their practice and default position.
     “‘Failed,’ come now.” Roark waved away Guy’s false modesty. “The flame still burns within. So I’m browsing the auction—decent to middling. Ho-hum Elizabeth Peyton, a rushed Henry Taylor. Nothing like 2005, when I picked up my Wiley for a song. It’s in the Montauk place—have you been?”
     “To yours? Yes, the last lawn party.” Guy disarmed the tuna with a third flute. He felt a tickle on his upper lip; a hair he’d missed shaving.
     “Of course, of course. Anyhow. I realized that none of my contemporary works depict our people.” He opened his arm to indicate the room. “The same applies for cinema, literature, popular song.”
     Guy leaned back in his chair. “You want more art about the affluent.” From this angle, the long-stemmed calla lilies in the centerpiece appeared an extension of Roark’s much-envied white pomp, amplifying the import of his speech and, when the uplights hit just so, giving the impression of a light bulb over his head.
     “More art by the affluent,” Roark replied. “No more of this reportage, these outsiders’ chronicles.”
     “Aren’t you writing your memoirs?”
     Roark didn’t hear the question. “In our society, we value individual life by the measure of one’s monetary reserve.” He put a hand over his wineglass at a waiter’s approach. “Why shouldn’t the highest-valued individuals be the ones telling the stories?”
     “And they’re not,” Guy replied.
     “Not like before. Proust. Montaigne, Wharton. All writers of means.”
     “De Sade, too,” Guy said. “Didn’t he torture sex workers?”
     “I’m not talking morality here—”
     “You guys are exactly right.” A man with an oval, featureless head peered around the centerpiece. He looked to Guy like that optical illusion of a face that could be seen upside down, the bald head becoming the chin, forehead wrinkles as tightened lips.
     “Exactly right,” the man continued. “Money is speech, after all, according to the highest court in the land. And we have the most speech!”
     Roark pointed his fork at the man. “Mind your manners, Saul. This is a private conversation.”
     Guy was vaguely familiar. A hedge fundie who’d long grown accustomed to speaking without pushback or request for clarification and so felt comfortable with specious bullshit like “I’m socially liberal but fiscally conservative.” As if there were any sphere of American life separate from money.
     They ignored him.
     “It’s an intriguing idea,” Guy said. He straightened and put his hand over his flute. “Implementation might be tricky.”
     “I thought of that. It should arise organically, hmm? After all, we’re people too.”
     “We are people too. That is correct.”
     Roark nodded toward the screen above the podium. The Jefferson Development Group’s anodyne logo flashed in a row of platinum supporters (“Close Friends of Oxfam”). Guy waited a beat for PrevYou. He could look up how much V’s advisory group recommended she donate. But he decided he didn’t care and it didn’t matter in the end. A six-figure fillip out of a ten-figure purse. Ah, there it was: Nice Friends of Oxfam. He hadn’t adjusted to the new logo, despite its ubiquity on the portfolios and notepads around the Manhattan place. The semiabstract drawing hinted at a crustacean, in the style of a single-stroke Picasso, which the consultant from Wolff Olins praised as “no-brow universalism.” V had to connect the dots for Guy: “Crab, cancer. You don’t get it?” Even when he saw the logo projected in Times Square to celebrate the Series H investment round—the squiggle floating above phrases like “from chaos, order” and “benign is divine”—Guy always saw it as purely gastrointestinal.
     Roark folded his napkin and set it on his plate. “I’m retiring for the evening. Will I see you at Averman’s?”
     “Victoria might attend. I don’t think I can tag along.”
     “Quite right. One invite per capita, no assistants, no partners. Which, given the holiday weekend, seems a bit strict.”
     V had mentioned Arthur Averman’s conference before she left for California. She made it sound onerous, though she considered all nontransactional gatherings on par with jury duty.
     “Enjoy answering all the big questions,” Guy said. “Saturday I’m being fêted by the Brooklyn Phil.”
     Roark pulled a coat check ticket from his breast pocket. Given the weather, Guy wondered if the man had checked an umbrella, despite arriving by car.
     “I hadn’t realized the outer boroughs supported their own philharmonics,” Roark said. “Well, good evening.”
     Guy thought of sticking around. See if anyone was up for a cognac in the semisecret lounge off the rear staircase. Then he remembered Averman’s advice during the First Flush, nearly a decade ago: Don’t stay too late, it looks desperate. Don’t act like you won’t have it next year. You will. You deserve it. You always have.
Praise for The Audacity

A Town & Country Must-Read Book of Spring
The Millions Most Anticipated Books of Spring
Lit Hub's Most Anticipated Books of 2024


“Delicious satire.”
Vanity Fair

“In this funny, observant novel, Ryan Chapman . . . looks closely at the state of wealth and the world today.”
Town & Country

“If you enjoy your satire blistering, your characters memorable and your prose searing, you’ve come to the right place.”
—Inside Hook

“[The Audacity] promises to bring back [Chapman’s] wildly original sense of humor.”
—Michael Schaub, Southern California News Group

“Chapman has a sharp eye and a sharper wit . . . [The Audacity] promises some good, hard laughs—however bitter they may be—at the expense of the über-rich.”
The Millions

“Hilarious . . . Chapman’s sharp humor earns him that place among the master satirists.”
—Lit Hub

“Off we go to visit the zoo of the ultra-wealthy and gawk at these neurotic animals in a painstakingly manicured facsimile of their natural habitat . . . Stretches of this book are hilarious, no doubt owing to [Chapman’s] strong prose stylist, his observations sharp and well-drawn.”
—The Rumpus

“Fans of The White Lotus will love this.”
—BookBub

“If you like hilarious and action-packed novels about far-from-perfect people, have I got a book for you. Theranos meets The Big Lebowski, with the luxury porn of Crazy Rich Asians sprinkled on top.”
—The Book Catapult

“Merciless satire of the super-rich, especially disruption-obsessed tech moguls . . . The Audacity has a lot in common with HBO's ‘Succession’—the rapid-fire chatter, knowing allusions, nihilistic detachment.”
Chronogram

“A jaunty and acidic satire of the ultrarich.”
Arlington Magazine

“Don’t make the mistake of thinking you’re better than these absurd tycoons; the point of the tale is that we’re all capable of outrageous hubris.”
—Bethanne Patrick, CultureWag

“Fearless, irreverent, and so very funny, The Audacity skewers the ego-driven disruption culture of the uber rich. Chapman is a master of satire, and his hilarious runs are threaded through with moving looks at American identity, grief, self-loathing and self-worth. This is a dark, timely, super smart book.”
—Kimberly King Parsons, author of Black Light
 
“There are funny books, and then there is the occasional novel that actually makes you cackle—which I did, repeatedly, as I read Ryan Chapman’s The Audacity. It’s a satire that hits on the line level, sparing none of its characters or observation from its skewering wit. Timely in its reference points, but timeless in what it says about the relationship between America, inequality, and cultural assimilation, this book is A Modest Proposal by way of Succession.”
—Kevin Nguyen, author of New Waves
 
“Ryan Chapman’s outstanding comic sensibility is matched by acrobatic prose of the first rank. The Audacity is an immersively entertaining, tightly controlled bullet of a novel.”
—Teddy Wayne, author of The Great Man Theory and Loner

“Equal parts Sam Lipsyte and Don DeLillo, The Audacity is razor-sharp satire about the lowlifes of high tech and the absurdity of our present reality. Chapman’s prose overflows with verve, wit, and intelligence, but he never forgets the tender, beating heart at the core. I tore through the book with laughter and envy.”
—Lincoln Michel, author of The Body Scout
 
“Almost exactly a hundred years later, this is The Great Gatsby, updated. This is the art of the affluent we want. The excesses of the lives of the idealistic or deluded or avaricious super-rich might all be false but what is certainly real is the energy on each page of this novel. The only way to blurb this book is simply quote from it. Martin Amis’s Money for really late, late capitalism.”
—Amitava Kumar, author of A Time Outside This Time
 
 “Ryan Chapman cavorts amidst the twisted wreckage of our zeitgeist like it’s his own rollicking funhouse. The Audacity is a tragicomic thrill ride that tips a trick-filled hat to postmodernists past as it delivers its devastating cultural critique. The smartest, most enjoyable novel I’ve read all year.”
—David Goodwillie, author of Kings County
 
“With The Audacity, Ryan Chapman has perfected the art of satire in a decidedly post-satire era. It is delicate work to mine humor from the daily bathos of Silicon Valley superachievers and their gnomic lusts, but with a surfeit of literary tools at his disposal, Chapman has done it. Employing the sector-specific fluencies of David Foster Wallace, the deadpan whimsy of Douglas Coupland, the intoxicated bite of early Martin Amis, and the postmodern empathy of Jennifer Egan, Chapman has conjured a tragicomic tech dystopia from an Onion headline, a hyper-capitalist wasteland populated by fleece-vested minor gods who haven’t quite realized they’ve already fallen from grace.”
—Jonny Diamond, editor of Literary Hub

“If one can't rein in the ultrarich, one can at least satirize them . . . Chapman’s approach befits this can-do crowd, and therein lies the appeal for readers critical of free-market absolutism and its ruthless adherents . . . [A] ferocious takedown.”
—Shelf Awareness

“Chapman proves his staying power as a shrewd and suspenseful satirist in his second novel . . . Chapman conveys malignant excess, arrogance, and greed in scenes of dizzying apocalyptic detail and acid humor.”
Booklist

“Chapman unspools a droll dramedy loosely based on the spectacular fall of fraudulent healthcare startup Theranos . . . A pithy send-up of one of Silicon Valley’s most intriguing crimes.”
Publishers Weekly

“[Chapman] has a keen eye for the foibles of the new gilded age.”
Kirkus Reviews


Praise for Ryan Chapman

“Chapman's book is one of the funniest American novels to come around in years, a sharp satire of the literary scene as well as the broken prison system. Despite the grim subject matter, Chapman packs more laughs into 128 pages than most sitcoms do in an entire season. Dark, daring, and laugh-out-loud hilarious, Riots I Have Known is one of the smartest—and best—novels of the year.”
—Michael Schaub, NPR
 
“A compact cluster bomb of satire that kills widely and indiscriminately . . . If you’re part of the Venn diagram that subscribes to n+1 and McSweeney’s, this is the funniest book you’ll read all year.”
—Ron Charles, The Washington Post

“[A] gritty, bracing debut . . . Told in searing, high velocity prose.”
—Adrienne Westenfeld, Esquire


“I cackled my way through the slim volume, but like I said, I might be strange. If you’re the same kind of strange, you might really love this book.”
—John Warner, The Chicago Tribune


“Chapman’s satirical jab packs a full-fledged punch.”
—The Millions


“Like a Nabokov novel written by a character who is constantly snorting Ritalin.”
—Chad Post, Three Percent

“[A] funny and excellent debut . . . Supremely mischievous and sublimely written, this is a stellar work.”
Publishers Weekly, Starred Review


“Ryan Chapman creates a narrative voice that is by turns tender, cruel, profane, wildly inventive, and, finally, unforgettable."
—Sam Lipsyte, author of Hark and The Ask

 
"Riots I Have Known is a multivalent title: Ryan Chapman’s debut is about a prison riot, unfurls a riot of word-drunk prose, and, most of all, is itself a riot, a virtuoso vocal performance of acidic seriocomedy whose forebears are Thomas Bernhard’s discursive monologues, Frederick Exley’s deadpan wit, and Kafka’s Kafkaesqueness, but which is ultimately, as they say, all Chapman’s own. It’s hard to find a single sentence that isn’t polished to a brilliant luster in this lacerating shiv of a novel."
—Teddy Wayne, author of Loner

"Hilarious, original, and cunningly wrought, Ryan Chapman has written a rocket-powered ode to literary creation and mass incarceration. Weaving satire and seriousness into a singularly rambunctious monologue, rollicking and oddly recognizable at once, Riots I Have Known is a breath of fresh air."
—Alexandra Kleeman, author of You Too Can Have a Body Like Mine

"With Riots I Have Known, Ryan Chapman has delivered a keen satire of America’s criminal justice crisis. The novel is remarkable for many things not the least of which are its wit, humor, and masterful language. I was impressed again and again, and I wager so too will readers with working hearts and brains."
—Mitchell S. Jackson, award-winning author of Survival Math

“Ryan Chapman is an exceptional stylist, and his range of reference runs from Fredric Jameson and Kafka to Carly Rae Jepsen and Kinfolk. Riots I Have Known is a smart, rambunctious, and (it just so happens) riotously funny debut novel. It's a book you don't so much read as ride like a roller coaster—i.e. very quickly, while hanging on for dear life and maybe screaming—and as soon as it's over you'll want to ride again.”
—Justin Taylor, author of Flings

Riots I Have Known moves at breakneck pace as a pent-up con runs free across every page. Chapman is his very own, and this is a book readers will devour.”
—Amelia Gray, author of Gutshot

Riots I Have Known is a wild yawp from the literary frontier that brings to mind both Roberto Bolaño and Thomas Bernhard. It is relentless, hilarious, and unabashedly smart. It's my new favorite manifesto and I loved every last page.”
—Scott Cheshire, author of High as the Horses’ Bridles

“Had Humbert Humbert started a literary journal from prison and penned a jailbreak scene with the spectacular absurdity of the one in Natural Born Killers, there would be a clear antecedent for Riots I Have Known. As it is, Ryan Chapman's book is fiercely original, darkly hilarious, and morally complex. Strong voice, both sympathetic and sharp as a shiv, calls the reader farther and farther into a prison on fire. Chapman's ability to play simultaneously in the two keys of gleeful wit and menace reminded me of Aravind Adiga's polytonality in White Tiger.”
—Will Chancellor, author of A Brave Man Seven Storeys Tall
Ryan Chapman is a Sri Lankan–American writer originally from Minneapolis, Minnesota, and currently based in Kingston, New York. He is the author of Riots I Have Known, which NPR named “one of the smartest—and best—novels of the year,” among other accolades. His criticism and humor pieces have appeared in Bookforum, The New Yorker, The Guardian, McSweeney’s, BOMB, The Brooklyn Rail, Frieze, and elsewhere.

About

A bracing satire about the implosion of a Theranos-like company, a collapsing marriage, and a billionaires’ “philanthropy summit,” for fans of Hari Kunzru and The White Lotus.

In 72 hours, a blockbuster exposé will reveal Victoria Stevens’s multibillion-dollar startup as a massive fraud. And Victoria has gone missing. Has she faked her death, leaving her husband, Guy Sarvananthan, to face the fallout— and potential jail time? Should Guy flee to his native Sri Lanka, an outcast and a failure? Or embrace denial? Opting for the latter, he takes the corporate jet to a private Caribbean island, where the 0.0001% have gathered to decide which one of the world’s biggest problems to “eradicate forever.” Guy drinks and drugs his way into oblivion, through manicured jungles and aboard superyachts, amid captains of industry, legions of staff, and unlikely saboteurs.
 
Meanwhile, Victoria narrates her side of the story from an off-the-grid location in the California desert. In scribbled diary entries shot through with cultish self-help mantras, she plots her comeback, confident she’ll prove everyone wrong. Again.
 
Ryan Chapman’s incisive novel is a swan dive into the abyss and “Martin Amis’s Money for really late, late capitalism” (Amitava Kumar, author of A Time Outside This Time).

Excerpt

Chapter 1
 
The necessary breakthroughs did not occur within the expected or justifiable life cycle of the product.”
     Guy received the text Thursday evening his time, late afternoon her time. He assumed it was meant for the company Slack. She had done this before: the dry nature of the missive, in addition to the formality of the grammar, contrasted with their clipped marital exchanges. Tonight was the Oxfam dinner, which V would have known. He replied with a question mark and drained his second flute.
     As a veteran of the gala circuit, he knew he had ten minutes to eat before interruption by glad-handers and chummy acquaintances. The tuna tartare was a sensorial affront, given the slides of West African children warped by malaria and wefted by malnutrition. At least next week’s Robin Hood gala wouldn’t stoop to a slideshow. Though the chatter at cocktails was that everyone was skipping Robin Hood. Booking Yo-Yo Ma so soon after the Drawing Center . . . Much too much Ma, and certainly not the mood. He took another bite and ignored the scolding voice-over by the model/actor/activist. Yet another ingenue embarrassed by their frictionless ascent.
     Roark Jefferson, seated to his left, pushed aside an untouched plate and sighed with glottal force. “The Drawing Center served steak. And they’re on the ropes. This mess”—he mashed the fleshy pink ziggurat with a fork—“is just guilt made manifest by some aspirant more sous than chef.”
     Guy loved Roark. To the manner born and, like a wizened character actor, a man one couldn’t imagine ever being under fifty. He wore bespoke pinstripe and Charvet shirting, which did a reasonable job of directing the eye away from the splotched complexion of an overripe banana, and he adhered to outmoded WASP traditions like only wearing sneakers on the tennis court. His family had accrued their wealth the old-fashioned way—that is, passively, as rentier moguls. Roark expanded his modest inheritance of Harlem brownstones into a quiet fiefdom and, at the age when most handed over the reins, multiplied his fortune by repurposing shipping containers as stand-alone rooftop apartments. This expansion of the housing inventory earned praise from the mayor and urban studies think tanks. Since Roark could not patent the concept, he stockpiled the global supply of coupling hardware for the containers, which braced the weight transversely. (Roark often corrected people on this point: the containers did not sit on top of the building, but “athwart” it.)
     He had come out of the closet at seventy, which he celebrated with the establishment of an invitation-only cigar club in the Flatiron District: “Like the Yale club, but more selective.”
     Roark leaned over as the slideshow closed with what sounded like fake Satie; the pat outro did not send one reaching for the pocketbook.
     “My boy,” Roark said. “Did I see you at the Drawing Center? A week ago Friday.”
     Guy remembered the invitation. It was either held in the same event space they were sitting in now—a former bank from the gilded age—or in the LES, at the other gilded-age bank-turned-event-space.
     “Couldn’t make it,” he said. “I Guggenheimed. We’re an underwriter.”
     “Well,” Roark said. “That evening I had an insight I’d like to share. With an aesthete such as yourself.”
     “A failed aesthete such as myself,” Guy replied. His previous life fascinated the gala set. They lacquered his decades as a struggling composer with vicarious nostalgia. He didn’t mind, was in fact grateful for how it assuaged his imposter syndrome after V’s pole-vault up the tax brackets. And for how it assuaged other aspects: Guy was almost always the only Sri Lankan in the room, whether it was high school in suburban Minneapolis, conservatory in Philadelphia, or these august rooms. At fundraisers and dinners “In Honor Of” whomever he played the Good Time Charlie, improvising cocktails at the bar (the Ironclad Prenup, the Bahama S-Corp) or tickling the ivories on someone’s Steinway. His piano was barely passable, even to his atrophied ear, and would have been shameful at the old alma mater. But the gala set gave him the benefit of the doubt. As was their practice and default position.
     “‘Failed,’ come now.” Roark waved away Guy’s false modesty. “The flame still burns within. So I’m browsing the auction—decent to middling. Ho-hum Elizabeth Peyton, a rushed Henry Taylor. Nothing like 2005, when I picked up my Wiley for a song. It’s in the Montauk place—have you been?”
     “To yours? Yes, the last lawn party.” Guy disarmed the tuna with a third flute. He felt a tickle on his upper lip; a hair he’d missed shaving.
     “Of course, of course. Anyhow. I realized that none of my contemporary works depict our people.” He opened his arm to indicate the room. “The same applies for cinema, literature, popular song.”
     Guy leaned back in his chair. “You want more art about the affluent.” From this angle, the long-stemmed calla lilies in the centerpiece appeared an extension of Roark’s much-envied white pomp, amplifying the import of his speech and, when the uplights hit just so, giving the impression of a light bulb over his head.
     “More art by the affluent,” Roark replied. “No more of this reportage, these outsiders’ chronicles.”
     “Aren’t you writing your memoirs?”
     Roark didn’t hear the question. “In our society, we value individual life by the measure of one’s monetary reserve.” He put a hand over his wineglass at a waiter’s approach. “Why shouldn’t the highest-valued individuals be the ones telling the stories?”
     “And they’re not,” Guy replied.
     “Not like before. Proust. Montaigne, Wharton. All writers of means.”
     “De Sade, too,” Guy said. “Didn’t he torture sex workers?”
     “I’m not talking morality here—”
     “You guys are exactly right.” A man with an oval, featureless head peered around the centerpiece. He looked to Guy like that optical illusion of a face that could be seen upside down, the bald head becoming the chin, forehead wrinkles as tightened lips.
     “Exactly right,” the man continued. “Money is speech, after all, according to the highest court in the land. And we have the most speech!”
     Roark pointed his fork at the man. “Mind your manners, Saul. This is a private conversation.”
     Guy was vaguely familiar. A hedge fundie who’d long grown accustomed to speaking without pushback or request for clarification and so felt comfortable with specious bullshit like “I’m socially liberal but fiscally conservative.” As if there were any sphere of American life separate from money.
     They ignored him.
     “It’s an intriguing idea,” Guy said. He straightened and put his hand over his flute. “Implementation might be tricky.”
     “I thought of that. It should arise organically, hmm? After all, we’re people too.”
     “We are people too. That is correct.”
     Roark nodded toward the screen above the podium. The Jefferson Development Group’s anodyne logo flashed in a row of platinum supporters (“Close Friends of Oxfam”). Guy waited a beat for PrevYou. He could look up how much V’s advisory group recommended she donate. But he decided he didn’t care and it didn’t matter in the end. A six-figure fillip out of a ten-figure purse. Ah, there it was: Nice Friends of Oxfam. He hadn’t adjusted to the new logo, despite its ubiquity on the portfolios and notepads around the Manhattan place. The semiabstract drawing hinted at a crustacean, in the style of a single-stroke Picasso, which the consultant from Wolff Olins praised as “no-brow universalism.” V had to connect the dots for Guy: “Crab, cancer. You don’t get it?” Even when he saw the logo projected in Times Square to celebrate the Series H investment round—the squiggle floating above phrases like “from chaos, order” and “benign is divine”—Guy always saw it as purely gastrointestinal.
     Roark folded his napkin and set it on his plate. “I’m retiring for the evening. Will I see you at Averman’s?”
     “Victoria might attend. I don’t think I can tag along.”
     “Quite right. One invite per capita, no assistants, no partners. Which, given the holiday weekend, seems a bit strict.”
     V had mentioned Arthur Averman’s conference before she left for California. She made it sound onerous, though she considered all nontransactional gatherings on par with jury duty.
     “Enjoy answering all the big questions,” Guy said. “Saturday I’m being fêted by the Brooklyn Phil.”
     Roark pulled a coat check ticket from his breast pocket. Given the weather, Guy wondered if the man had checked an umbrella, despite arriving by car.
     “I hadn’t realized the outer boroughs supported their own philharmonics,” Roark said. “Well, good evening.”
     Guy thought of sticking around. See if anyone was up for a cognac in the semisecret lounge off the rear staircase. Then he remembered Averman’s advice during the First Flush, nearly a decade ago: Don’t stay too late, it looks desperate. Don’t act like you won’t have it next year. You will. You deserve it. You always have.

Reviews

Praise for The Audacity

A Town & Country Must-Read Book of Spring
The Millions Most Anticipated Books of Spring
Lit Hub's Most Anticipated Books of 2024


“Delicious satire.”
Vanity Fair

“In this funny, observant novel, Ryan Chapman . . . looks closely at the state of wealth and the world today.”
Town & Country

“If you enjoy your satire blistering, your characters memorable and your prose searing, you’ve come to the right place.”
—Inside Hook

“[The Audacity] promises to bring back [Chapman’s] wildly original sense of humor.”
—Michael Schaub, Southern California News Group

“Chapman has a sharp eye and a sharper wit . . . [The Audacity] promises some good, hard laughs—however bitter they may be—at the expense of the über-rich.”
The Millions

“Hilarious . . . Chapman’s sharp humor earns him that place among the master satirists.”
—Lit Hub

“Off we go to visit the zoo of the ultra-wealthy and gawk at these neurotic animals in a painstakingly manicured facsimile of their natural habitat . . . Stretches of this book are hilarious, no doubt owing to [Chapman’s] strong prose stylist, his observations sharp and well-drawn.”
—The Rumpus

“Fans of The White Lotus will love this.”
—BookBub

“If you like hilarious and action-packed novels about far-from-perfect people, have I got a book for you. Theranos meets The Big Lebowski, with the luxury porn of Crazy Rich Asians sprinkled on top.”
—The Book Catapult

“Merciless satire of the super-rich, especially disruption-obsessed tech moguls . . . The Audacity has a lot in common with HBO's ‘Succession’—the rapid-fire chatter, knowing allusions, nihilistic detachment.”
Chronogram

“A jaunty and acidic satire of the ultrarich.”
Arlington Magazine

“Don’t make the mistake of thinking you’re better than these absurd tycoons; the point of the tale is that we’re all capable of outrageous hubris.”
—Bethanne Patrick, CultureWag

“Fearless, irreverent, and so very funny, The Audacity skewers the ego-driven disruption culture of the uber rich. Chapman is a master of satire, and his hilarious runs are threaded through with moving looks at American identity, grief, self-loathing and self-worth. This is a dark, timely, super smart book.”
—Kimberly King Parsons, author of Black Light
 
“There are funny books, and then there is the occasional novel that actually makes you cackle—which I did, repeatedly, as I read Ryan Chapman’s The Audacity. It’s a satire that hits on the line level, sparing none of its characters or observation from its skewering wit. Timely in its reference points, but timeless in what it says about the relationship between America, inequality, and cultural assimilation, this book is A Modest Proposal by way of Succession.”
—Kevin Nguyen, author of New Waves
 
“Ryan Chapman’s outstanding comic sensibility is matched by acrobatic prose of the first rank. The Audacity is an immersively entertaining, tightly controlled bullet of a novel.”
—Teddy Wayne, author of The Great Man Theory and Loner

“Equal parts Sam Lipsyte and Don DeLillo, The Audacity is razor-sharp satire about the lowlifes of high tech and the absurdity of our present reality. Chapman’s prose overflows with verve, wit, and intelligence, but he never forgets the tender, beating heart at the core. I tore through the book with laughter and envy.”
—Lincoln Michel, author of The Body Scout
 
“Almost exactly a hundred years later, this is The Great Gatsby, updated. This is the art of the affluent we want. The excesses of the lives of the idealistic or deluded or avaricious super-rich might all be false but what is certainly real is the energy on each page of this novel. The only way to blurb this book is simply quote from it. Martin Amis’s Money for really late, late capitalism.”
—Amitava Kumar, author of A Time Outside This Time
 
 “Ryan Chapman cavorts amidst the twisted wreckage of our zeitgeist like it’s his own rollicking funhouse. The Audacity is a tragicomic thrill ride that tips a trick-filled hat to postmodernists past as it delivers its devastating cultural critique. The smartest, most enjoyable novel I’ve read all year.”
—David Goodwillie, author of Kings County
 
“With The Audacity, Ryan Chapman has perfected the art of satire in a decidedly post-satire era. It is delicate work to mine humor from the daily bathos of Silicon Valley superachievers and their gnomic lusts, but with a surfeit of literary tools at his disposal, Chapman has done it. Employing the sector-specific fluencies of David Foster Wallace, the deadpan whimsy of Douglas Coupland, the intoxicated bite of early Martin Amis, and the postmodern empathy of Jennifer Egan, Chapman has conjured a tragicomic tech dystopia from an Onion headline, a hyper-capitalist wasteland populated by fleece-vested minor gods who haven’t quite realized they’ve already fallen from grace.”
—Jonny Diamond, editor of Literary Hub

“If one can't rein in the ultrarich, one can at least satirize them . . . Chapman’s approach befits this can-do crowd, and therein lies the appeal for readers critical of free-market absolutism and its ruthless adherents . . . [A] ferocious takedown.”
—Shelf Awareness

“Chapman proves his staying power as a shrewd and suspenseful satirist in his second novel . . . Chapman conveys malignant excess, arrogance, and greed in scenes of dizzying apocalyptic detail and acid humor.”
Booklist

“Chapman unspools a droll dramedy loosely based on the spectacular fall of fraudulent healthcare startup Theranos . . . A pithy send-up of one of Silicon Valley’s most intriguing crimes.”
Publishers Weekly

“[Chapman] has a keen eye for the foibles of the new gilded age.”
Kirkus Reviews


Praise for Ryan Chapman

“Chapman's book is one of the funniest American novels to come around in years, a sharp satire of the literary scene as well as the broken prison system. Despite the grim subject matter, Chapman packs more laughs into 128 pages than most sitcoms do in an entire season. Dark, daring, and laugh-out-loud hilarious, Riots I Have Known is one of the smartest—and best—novels of the year.”
—Michael Schaub, NPR
 
“A compact cluster bomb of satire that kills widely and indiscriminately . . . If you’re part of the Venn diagram that subscribes to n+1 and McSweeney’s, this is the funniest book you’ll read all year.”
—Ron Charles, The Washington Post

“[A] gritty, bracing debut . . . Told in searing, high velocity prose.”
—Adrienne Westenfeld, Esquire


“I cackled my way through the slim volume, but like I said, I might be strange. If you’re the same kind of strange, you might really love this book.”
—John Warner, The Chicago Tribune


“Chapman’s satirical jab packs a full-fledged punch.”
—The Millions


“Like a Nabokov novel written by a character who is constantly snorting Ritalin.”
—Chad Post, Three Percent

“[A] funny and excellent debut . . . Supremely mischievous and sublimely written, this is a stellar work.”
Publishers Weekly, Starred Review


“Ryan Chapman creates a narrative voice that is by turns tender, cruel, profane, wildly inventive, and, finally, unforgettable."
—Sam Lipsyte, author of Hark and The Ask

 
"Riots I Have Known is a multivalent title: Ryan Chapman’s debut is about a prison riot, unfurls a riot of word-drunk prose, and, most of all, is itself a riot, a virtuoso vocal performance of acidic seriocomedy whose forebears are Thomas Bernhard’s discursive monologues, Frederick Exley’s deadpan wit, and Kafka’s Kafkaesqueness, but which is ultimately, as they say, all Chapman’s own. It’s hard to find a single sentence that isn’t polished to a brilliant luster in this lacerating shiv of a novel."
—Teddy Wayne, author of Loner

"Hilarious, original, and cunningly wrought, Ryan Chapman has written a rocket-powered ode to literary creation and mass incarceration. Weaving satire and seriousness into a singularly rambunctious monologue, rollicking and oddly recognizable at once, Riots I Have Known is a breath of fresh air."
—Alexandra Kleeman, author of You Too Can Have a Body Like Mine

"With Riots I Have Known, Ryan Chapman has delivered a keen satire of America’s criminal justice crisis. The novel is remarkable for many things not the least of which are its wit, humor, and masterful language. I was impressed again and again, and I wager so too will readers with working hearts and brains."
—Mitchell S. Jackson, award-winning author of Survival Math

“Ryan Chapman is an exceptional stylist, and his range of reference runs from Fredric Jameson and Kafka to Carly Rae Jepsen and Kinfolk. Riots I Have Known is a smart, rambunctious, and (it just so happens) riotously funny debut novel. It's a book you don't so much read as ride like a roller coaster—i.e. very quickly, while hanging on for dear life and maybe screaming—and as soon as it's over you'll want to ride again.”
—Justin Taylor, author of Flings

Riots I Have Known moves at breakneck pace as a pent-up con runs free across every page. Chapman is his very own, and this is a book readers will devour.”
—Amelia Gray, author of Gutshot

Riots I Have Known is a wild yawp from the literary frontier that brings to mind both Roberto Bolaño and Thomas Bernhard. It is relentless, hilarious, and unabashedly smart. It's my new favorite manifesto and I loved every last page.”
—Scott Cheshire, author of High as the Horses’ Bridles

“Had Humbert Humbert started a literary journal from prison and penned a jailbreak scene with the spectacular absurdity of the one in Natural Born Killers, there would be a clear antecedent for Riots I Have Known. As it is, Ryan Chapman's book is fiercely original, darkly hilarious, and morally complex. Strong voice, both sympathetic and sharp as a shiv, calls the reader farther and farther into a prison on fire. Chapman's ability to play simultaneously in the two keys of gleeful wit and menace reminded me of Aravind Adiga's polytonality in White Tiger.”
—Will Chancellor, author of A Brave Man Seven Storeys Tall

Author

Ryan Chapman is a Sri Lankan–American writer originally from Minneapolis, Minnesota, and currently based in Kingston, New York. He is the author of Riots I Have Known, which NPR named “one of the smartest—and best—novels of the year,” among other accolades. His criticism and humor pieces have appeared in Bookforum, The New Yorker, The Guardian, McSweeney’s, BOMB, The Brooklyn Rail, Frieze, and elsewhere.